From Megillah to Madness…and Back Again: AIPAC 2016

 

On the eve of the Festival of Purim, before we listen to or read the Megillah, partake in libations and festive affairs, and recall the strength of our Purim heroes, I thought it would be an ideal time to reflect on my recent experience at this year’s AIPAC Policy Conference. Throughout the Policy Conference, I had a chance to (re)connect with many congregants, colleagues, and friends. The energy was elevated, and the tension palpable. Over 18,000 came together to show their support and love of Israel.

First, some framing with regard to my general thinking on Israel and AIPAC:

  1. I believe that we, as a collective Jewish people, stand taller and prouder today because of the amazing and incredible work that Israel does in many areas.  It is continually innovative, forward thinking, and visionary in spite of constant threats on its borders and throughout the region.
  1. More Americans, regardless of religious or race affiliation, should support the work of AIPAC. Why?
    • AIPAC is one of the few places that supports bi-partisan conversation and work towards a common goal, further promoting the success and safety of the Jewish State. And this “bipartisanship” nourishes our ethical obligation to see the humanity in the other.
    • America needs Israel.  Israel needs America. AIPAC works unfailingly to strengthen these two democracies’ joint work in critical and meaningful ways.

At this year’s Policy Conference, I connected with and learned from African American state legislators, as they passionately spoke about the enormous impact IsraAid has had on their communities – coming to the relief of some of the poorest communities in the U.S. last year during the worst floods seen there in over 1000 years.

I also learned about the unbroken commitment to Israeli ingenuity. For example, SoftWheel is a company that is supporting wheelchair-bound individuals by putting suspensions in the actual wheel or wheelchairs – meaning no more flat tires and increase comfort for those in the chairs! And this technology is starting to be used in bikes and cars! The company was founded by IDF veterans, and supports our US vets as well – incredible genius as just one example of the extraordinary innovations from Israeli society working in partnerships with the U.S.

In addition to these impactful take-aways, the conference is commingled with countless sessions on everything Israel: education, policy, diplomatic relations, social justice, lobbying – you name it. And this year, delegates had an opportunity that witness something that only comes about every 4 years: to hear from this year’s presidential candidates LIVE.

Since I have been a rabbi I have stayed away from commenting on partisan politics. I believe that the job of a rabbi is to foster sacred space and enable others to feel free to voice their own opinion, without judgment or reservation. Yet besides being one of the spiritual advisers in my congregation, I am also a father of two. And as a father, I feel responsible to teach my children that when there is wickedness in our midst, we must stand up and recognize it. Whether at home, in our school or local communities – even the political arena, it is our moral and religious imperative.

I believe that it is vital for any U.S. Presidential candidate to illustrate their commitment to a strong U.S.-Israel relationship. And I deeply value that 4 of the 5 current candidates understood how important it was to showcase his/her platform on the U.S.-Israel relationship, and how they would actualize their vision come January, 2017. Additionally, I feel that AIPAC had every right, as a bipartisan lobbying group, to invite all candidates, regardless of rhetoric. After all, they are vying for the highest office in our land, and should be afforded an opportunity to engage with a crowd that has a desire to know where they stand on this strategic partnership with America’s closest ally.

Upon reflection, all of the candidates promoted their deep love and commitment to Israel, through either substantive or strategic proposals (Clinton and Kasich, and at times, Cruz), or through personal narrative (Trump). The 3 republicans voiced their strong opposition for the Iran deal, which seemed to serve as a centerpiece for their remarks. Some of them also focused their statements on policy failures by the current administration, rather than lay out any substantive plans. Some brief highlights: Cruz quoting Talmud, Clinton bringing on (Pure)im, Kasich on his relationship with Sharansky, and Trump boasting about his Jewish grandchildren. For me, both Clinton and Kasich spoke passionately, with experience and commanded-ness, about the U.S.-Israel relationship, both of their vision making reasonable and short and long-term strategic sense.

Yet, while substance was provided during most of the speeches, sadly, the wickedness we have seen throughout this election cycle reared its ugly head on Monday night as well. As anticipated (and boy he did not surprise), I experienced an early Purim Shpiel of sorts – outrageous declarations, silly cheers and boos, all of which caused many to mask our truest selves, and sew confusion over who is good and who is wicked. As a glass half full guy, I was hoping for a muted response and ideally, in advance of the policy conference, a voice that would distance AIPAC from potential inflammatory statements from Mr. Trump, and given the organization an opportunity to model their theme: #cometogether. Sadly, it never happened. Nevertheless, the next morning, AIPAC leadership stood front and center and shared much of what needed to be said. I felt, at least, it was a good start and much-need teshuvah (repentance) (click here to read the remarks):

They condemned Mr. Trump’s incendiary remarks against President Obama and misguided rhetoric. I stood proud in that moment, in contrast to the great discomfort I felt as he approached the center of the arena to share his 15-20 minute oratory.

Truth be told, “wicked” is a term identified who those who seek to bring others down; those who seek to find the worst in others. I believe our tradition would certainly qualify Mr. Trump as such. From his call on banning all Muslims from entering the United States, to his lengthy evasion to disavow support from David Duke, his pervasive and persistent misogyny, proposals to make torture legal, and a call to kill the families of terrorism suspects (to name a few), there is no doubt in my mind that his campaign has, and continues to inspire and unmask those who promote these injustices. 

This evening, we will read the Book of Esther and recall that good triumphed over evil: King Ahasuerus first seduces the people of his kingdom with lavish parties – his people grateful for his seemingly “audacious hospitality”. It is at that moment that the King elevates the wicked Haman (boo) to a position of great power. Haman eventually manufacturers an edict to kill the Jews in his kingdom, but Mordechai, a Jew living in Shushan, senses Haman’s potential power and refuses to bow down. All but Mordechai prostrate themselves before Haman.

It is at the moment that I believe Mordechai spoke great truth to power. On Monday evening, I thought of my children and the messages I wanted to convey to them. And as I write this, I am able to draw inspiration from our narrative. We must not bow down and kneel to those who inspire hatred and overlook calls for violence. This is our mandate and our sacred responsibility.

So, what can we do when our political landscape affords bullies the platform to dominate public arenas? As a Jewish people, we look to our tradition, to God, and to the world around us. And, as a modern Jewish community determined to learn from those around us – we listen, we learn, and we act.

Our Rabbinic teachings note: “Silence implies consent.” We will not and cannot be silent. Our “more perfect union” is indeed, not so perfect. And as progressive Jews, we have a moral imperative to become more involved with groups like AIPAC, not less. We must make our voices heard, and demand more of our elected officials. We must not remain silent. We must not stand idly by. There is no room for hate. Our child deserve more.

I hope you will join me at next year’s AIPAC Conference (click here to register NOW) to add your voice in advocacy, and in support and love for the Jewish state.

Also….sign up to follow my blog: http://www.tstbedford.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s